Showing 1495 results

People and Organizations

Women's Study Guild

  • Corporate body
  • 1931-1998

The Young Women's Guild was formed under the auspices of the John Street United Church in Belleville, Ontario in 1931. Its aim was "to study and discuss current topics in the light of the principles of Jesus' teaching". Members prepared talks on topics of interest to members and a guest speaker was invited once a year to address the group. During the Depression they organized a School for Leisure in the church hall, as a place for people to meet and learn basic skills such as knitting, nutrition, carpentry, sewing, and bookkeeping.

The name of the organization was changed at the 29th March 1950 meeting to the Women's Guild.

The future of the Guild was discussed at a meeting held on 28th September 1998, when it was unanimously agreed that the Study Guild should cease to exist. The remaining funds of the organization were donated to Eastminster Church.

Wishart, Lois Christina

  • Person
  • 1907-2011

Lois Wishart was a resident of Belleville, Ontario and an active volunteer in the community. She married George Wishart in Pointe-Fortune United Church on 5th June 1929 in Quebec. She was president of the Women's Study Guild in Belleville several times in the history of that organization and looked after the group's archives when it was disbanded.

Township of Thurlow

  • Corporate body
  • 1850-1998

The first two concessions of Thurlow Township were surveyed in 1787 by Louis Kotte, by which time the land adjacent to the Bay of Quinte had already been partly settled by Loyalists. For municipal purposes it was joined with Sidney Township until 1798, when it held its own town meetings. Belleville became a separate town in 1836 and Thurlow's first township council met in 1850. In 1998 the two were reunited and Thurlow Ward became part of the enlarged City of Belleville.

Township of Tyendinaga

  • Corporate body
  • 1820-

Tyendinaga Township, Ontario, was formed through the alienation of land originally granted to the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte in 1784 (confirmed by the Simcoe deed of 1793: https://docs.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/llisapi.dll/fetch/2000/90464/90552/92263/790736/890819/956564/956846/995761/C24-4-6_-_Simcoe_Deed_A3K1G9.pdf?nodeid=994999&vernum=-2). The first four concessions of the township were surveyed in 1820 and the rear concessions in the 1840s. The settlement of Deseronto was separated from the Township in 1871 when it became a village.

Thompson, James

  • Person
  • fl. 1929

Photographer in Belleville, Ontario.

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (Belleville)

  • Corporate body
  • 1830-

On February 17, 1823 the Surveyor General Thomas Ridout approved an Order of Council allowing John Turnbull, William H. Wallbridge, William Zwick, and Roswell Leavens of the Town of Belleville; and Charles Bonisted of the Township of Sydney to form a Presbyterian Church in Belleville on Lots 30 and 31 on the east side of Church Street at the corner of Victoria Avenue. The minister's house was built off Church Street below the Armory. The first church was erected on that spot in 1830, known as old St. Andrew's and the first reverend was Reverend James Ketchan who left for Scotland in 1844. St. Andrew's was then left without its own minister for five years. Up until 1858 the church was lit by tallow candles, at which time gas was secured by laying a main to the corner of John and Hotel Streets. A manse for the pastor was built on George Street in 1866.

In 1870, a brick building replaced the existing wooden structure. This building, which contained Belleville's only chime bells, was destroyed by fire in 1894. The current building was built in 1895 and seats about 800 people. In the time between the church fire and the new edifice being built, the congregation met at the Ontario Business School. By the end of 1923 St. Andrew's membership was 395. In 1925, the church voted against entering the United Church of Canada, however many left after the vote including the church's leader, Reverend A.S. Kerr who was replaced by R.G. Stewart.

The postwar boom saw the congregation grow, as membership reached 770 by 1954. However, attendance began to decline at the end of the twentieth century.

St. Andrew's first woman minister, Reverend Anne-Marie Jones, was appointed in 2001.

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